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Architectural Photography: the built environment

An online talk giving tips and techniques for top quality architectural and interiors photography

My May 2021 online photography talk, Architectural Photography: the built environment, went ahead on 19th May, and you can now watch the recording here. Just click on the image below to get it started. I hope you enjoy it: if you do, then please Like and Share it.

If you’d like to stay in touch about all my videos then please subscribe to my You Tube channel – you’ll be able to do so towards the end of this video, or by going to the Nigel Hicks Photography You Tube channel.

What is architectural photography?

Architectural photography covers a wide gamut of subject matter: everything to do with the human built environment, ranging from entire urban skylines through single buildings, to tight building details, to intimate interiors. This is true whether you’re dealing with photography of modern or historic architecture: the techniques and purpose are exactly the same.

It is all just architectural photography: the built environment.

Architectural Photography: the built environment

Technically correct versus creative techniques

One of the major challenges of architectural photography is that the great majority of building photos come out with the building apparently leaning backwards, their vertical lines no longer vertical or parallel to each other, but converging towards the top of the frame.

This is an inevitable result of having to tip the camera back in order to fit the whole building into the frame, something that is particularly problematic with tall buildings.

The result may look OK in ordinary snapshot photography, but it doesn’t pass muster in high quality architectural photography. So what is the solution?

The answer lies in the central theme of my talk, that there are essentially two broad types of technique applied to architectural ph0tography: technically correct and creative techniques.

The former are used when you want to reproduce buildings in their correct perspective, that is with their verticals actually vertical and parallel: the building stands up straight in the image, with none of the usual leaning back scenario.

Creative techniques, are quite the opposite. Here, almost anything goes, with crazy angles and diagonal lines. Very often that ‘leaning back’ phenomenon is exaggerated for both artistic license and to create some strong diagonal lines that instil a dynamic, energetic mood into what could otherwise be a very static subject.

architectural photography: the built environment

How do we achieve technically correct photography?

The essential step towards achieving technically correct photography is to keep the back of the camera (and hence the sensor inside it) vertical and parallel to the walls of the building(s) being photographed. But how can we do this if the only way to fit the building in the frame is to tip the camera back?

The best method is to use a shift lens. This is a very specialised lens that allows the camera to literally look upwards while keeping the camera back vertical. The lens elements literally slide up and down on a rack, putting them out of direct line with the sensor, creating an upward or downward field of view, instead of the usual straight ahead.

The above is a rather expensive solution. Instead, it is possible simply to use an ordinary wide-angle lens, shoot in the usual way with the camera tilted back, and then correct the perspective aberration using Photoshop post-photography. This works quite well, up to a point, but can result in loss of image quality if an extreme amount of perspective correction is needed.

More commonly, an architectural photographer will use a shift lens for the shoot, and will then simply add a few small final corrections in Photoshop.

It is also possible to use an ordinary wide-angle lens with the camera back vertical. However, this will result in the building being in the top half of the frame with an awful lot of foreground captured in the lower half. If you’re trying to shoot a tall building in this way, you’ll need to back up quite some way to get the whole building’s height in, really opening up the amount of foreground visible in the final image.

This means that your foreground had better be extremely interesting, helping to really augment the building as the image’s main subject. One of the best foreground elements to include, where possible, is calm water, providing the possibility of a beautiful reflection of your subject building, thus doubling its size and effectively bringing it into the lower half of the frame, as well as the top half.

Architectural Photography: the built environment

How do we make use of creative techniques?

It’s actually rather difficult to lay down rules here, as just about anything goes. The usual rules of image composition apply: keep your compositions simple with a single strong subject dominating the frame. It is essential that nothing else in the frame competes for attention: clutter is your worst enemy. And in architectural photography that usually means such issues as parked cars, overhead wires, yellow no-parking lines, wheelie bins, satellite dishes and TV aerials. We really don’t want to see these in your architectural photos!

Within those rules we’re out to capture really geometric compositions, coordinated combinations of diagonals, verticals, horizontals and various shapes. Together they should result in truly graphic, impactful compositions.

Architectural Photography: the built environment

Details

While much of our architectural photography may revolve around entire buildings, the story is not complete without some details. In modern buildings these will often consist of a concentration on curving or diagonal lines in a building’s shape, geometric patterns in the walls or windows, and an interplay of light and reflection off those structures.

In historic buildings, some of these factors may also come into play, though it is also more likely to encompass embellishments, such as sculptures, statues and spires, most often seen on churches and cathedrals.

Villa window close-up

Interiors photography

The inside of a building is just as important to architectural photography as the outside. Indeed, in many instances – such as hotels and restaurants – the interior may be a lot more important.

Interiors can vary enormously, from huge public spaces that make some kind of statement to the world – perhaps civic or religious, for example – through a whole host of different building types, right through to the smallest and most intimate rooms in your home, including the bathroom.

While creative photographic techniques can commonly be used in interiors photography, more often the technically correct techniques are the most important. Leaning walls (usually leaning outwards in interiors photography) just don’t pass muster in most instances.

More often than not these days interiors photography makes use simply of whatever ambient light is available. No additional lighting is inserted, the removal of shadows or bright highlights being left to Photoshop in post-photography processing.

Finally, the most challenging room in interiors photography? The bathroom! It is usually very small and is often filled with reflective surfaces. Together, these two factors can make it very difficult to get a workable angle.

Harpa interior

A final word

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading this summary and watching the video of this talk Architectural Photography: the built environment. If you have any queries or comments don’t hesitate to get in touch.

The next talk will be People Photography, on 16th June at 8pm.

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Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants

An online talk by Nigel Hicks, given live on 21st April 2021

Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants is the title for my April 2021 online photography talk. A recording of the talk has now been posted on You Tube, and you can watch it right here. Just click on the image below.

A world of macrophotography

The Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants talk introduced many of the techniques needed for insect and plant photography, focussing most especially on the areas of overlap. This particularly applies to the area of close-up, or macrophotography, the skills needed for the photography of small subjects.

Obviously, this does not apply to the photography of entire or larger plants, but is important in the photography of flowers, particularly the smaller wild flowers commonly seen in the UK’s woodlands and pastures.

The essential problem – especially when photographing insects – is that the subject is usally so very small. You might be tempted to try to shoot using a telephoto lens, but you quickly find that such a lens has a minimum focussing distance that is just too long. It won’t allow you to come close enough to get an insect or small flower large enough in the final image.

There are two solutions to this problem:

  1. To use a dedicated telephoto lens that is specifcally designed to have a very short minimum focussing distance. This the classic macro lens.
  2. Or you can use an extension tube. This is a very small piece of kit, simply a ring containing no lens, that you insert between the back of a standard telephoto lens and the camera body. This lengthens the focussing distance between the back of the lens and the camera’s sensor, allowing the light rights to be focussed correctly.

The first is an extremely versatile, high quality piece of equipment, while the latter is much cheaper and smaller to carry around, quickly converting an ordinary telephoto lens into one that works at close-up distances.

Welcome to the world of macrophotography, as applied to wildlife photography: insects and plants.

Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants

Too close for comfort

So now we can get close to our subject to make it large in our final image. But close enough for us may well be a bit too close for many insects. As you shuffle in with your macro kit it is very easy to frighten off such sensitive animals as butterflies and damselflies, thus completely defeating the object of the exercise. Needless to say, this problem doesn’t apply to flowers, so here we can come in as close as we need to!

So how do we solve the problem of insect shyness? Firstly, there’s the way you approach them, with a couple of does and don’ts:

  1. Never put your shadow across the subject;
  2. Tread very lightly – the slightest vibration through the ground will disturb the insect, especially one that is on the ground;
  3. Absolutely don’t brush against any part of the plant that your subject is resting on;
  4. Don’t rush, just move very slowly. There are times when an insect can seem to accept your presence, but don’t bet on it!

Secondly, there’s the equipment, the right choice of which can help you keep your distance. If using a macro lens, don’t try using one with a focal length of less than 100mm when shooting out in the field. Macro lenses of shorter focal lengths will entail you having to come in just too close for a timid insect to tolerate. Even a 100mm lens is pushing it, and a 150mm lens might be better.

If using an extension tube, you might normally couple it with a 100mm telephoto lens (or equivalent zoom lens). However, if this is making you come in too close then consider coupling it with a longer focal length lens, such as a 200mm or even 300mm lens. Doing this will enable you to stay a reasonable distance from your subject (as much as a metre if using a 300mm lens), helping to soothe its nerves.

If your lens has a hood, think about not using it. Having one of these on the front of your lens greatly shortens the lens-subject distance, thus increasing the problem.

As ever, there is a trade-off. The longer the focal length of your lens and the further you are from the subject, the lower your magnification. If a high magnification is essential to you then you may need to persist with the much closer view.

Keeping it sharp

One of the biggest challenges of macro photography is that of depth of field – the amount of an image that is sharp. As you come in really close to a subject the depth of field becomes really tiny – often less than a centimetre. So focussing is critical. A couple of steps to help this include:

  1. Keep your lens aperture really narrow – no less than f/11, and preferably f/16 or f/22. This will maximise your depth of field (though it will still be tiny!);
  2. Set the lens up so that it is at right-angles to the main surface of your subject (such as a butterfly’s wings), thus maximising your chances of having everything sharp from the head to the tips of the wings.
Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants

Photography on the move

Given that any insect subjects will be constantly on the move, you will need to be too. Don’t try using a tripod – just setting one up will be enough to frighten off your subject. So hand-hold your camera.

So this means having to use a shutter speed fast enough to have no camera shake, which of course creates a conflict with the need to keep the lens aperture really narrow. A narrow lens aperture inevitable means a slow shutter speed (for any given ISO setting) as the amount of light reaching the sensor must remain in balance. To have a fast shutter speed you will need to open the lens aperture to allow in more light. This conflict is a difficult one to solve, but here are a couple of methods:

  1. Put up the camera’s ISO. This makes the sensor more sensitive, and so will need less light to be correctly exposed. The problem with this is that as your ISO goes up so image quality deteriorates. However, with the latest generation of cameras this is much less of a problem than it used to be. So if you have a newer model this is a worthwhile approach;
  2. Use a flashgun. Firing a flash will allow you to use a somewhat slower shutter speed than would otherwise be possible. With it firing to balance with the ambient light, it will also put in some fill-in light on your subject, helping to remove any awkward shadows, particularly on a sunny day.

A bit of flash

A bit of fill-in flash is a highly useful tool for insect photography, but I really don’t recommend it for plants – it can all too often put harsh shadows in around the plant, and may cause white flowers to burn out.

It has to be done with a good quality flashgun, however. Because your subject is very close, the gun must be able automatically to quench its power output down to quite low levels in order to avoid blasting the subject with far too much light. You will often need some manual override too, so you can turn it down even more if necessary.

Furthermore, it is usually better not to fire the flash directly at the subject, but to bounce it off a reflector (attached to the top of the flashgun), thus softening the light.

If your camera body has in in-built pop-up flash, resist the temptation to use it for this technique. It is not sufficiently versatile, it can’t be fired indirectly, and because the subject is so close to the end of the lens it may well put a shadow from the lens across the subject.

Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants

What about the plants?

Most of what I’ve said so far has concentrated on insects. So what about the plants?

There is plenty of overlap in techniques. For small flowers, macrophotography techniques and equipment apply, though of course not the part of about them possibly running or flying away! Also I do not recommend the use of a flashgun, although occasionally it can be useful.

You may be much more likely to use a tripod with plant photography, thus making sure you can use a narrow lens aperture (ie a high f-number) while keeping low shutter speeds and ISO. It also ensures that you keep exactly to the chosen composition, something that is hard to achieve if shooting hand-held.

Of course, a low shutter speed only works if there is no wind to blow the plant around, and many are the occasions when I have had to wait a long time for a lull in the wind to give me a motionless plant!

A wide-angle alternative

One method that applies only to plant photography is wide-angle photography. Of course, the main method of coming in close relies on macrophotography, which is perfect for showing close-up details of the plant. However, it is useless if you want also to show the plant’s environment.

This is where the wide-angle technique comes in. Bringing a wide-angle lens in as close to a plant as its minimum focussing distance will allow, can result in a reasonably close view of the subject plant, while at the same time showing a good chunk of environment in the background.

You won’t be able to come as close to the plant as a macro technique will allow, and for it to work at all your wide-angle lens must have a quite a short minimum focussing distance, something that not all such lenses have.

When it works it is really very effective.

Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants

A final word

Some of these macro techniques are not easy – particularly the photography of insects on the move – and initially success is hard to achieve. But with practice and a lot of failed images success will slowly come. It is worth it because the results can be quite stunning.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this summary of my Wildlife Photography: Insects and Plants talk, and I hope you will/have enjoy/ed watching it.

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Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds

My March online photography talk, Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds, went ahead on the 24th, and you can now watch a recording of the entire talk here.

To watch the talk just click on the screen below:

Preparing to succeed

In talking about Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds I first set out the fact that most of what goes into successfully capturing wildlife images has little to do with the equipment you use. Much of the success lies in the preparation, which includes such some of the following points:

  • Understand the behaviour of the animals you intend to photograph;
  • Know what are the best locations/habitats, times of day and times of year in which to find your subjects;
  • Learn how to stalk carefully, or how to use a hide;
  • Decide whether to work wholly with wild wildlife or accept the inclusion of captive animals;
  • When photographing wild wildlife, research locations where your subject wildlife has become used to the human presence, and so is more approachable than might usually be the case;
  • Have huge amounts of patience and persistence, coupled with an ability to act quickly but calmly and smoothly when things suddenly start to happen;
  • Have a willingness to get out of bed very early and/or stay out quite late, since most wildlife activity usually happens around dawn/sunrise and dusk/sunset.
Puffin in flight. Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds.

Deciding what to photograph

Why take wildlife photos? There are of course many reasons, including such ideas as:

  • Simply ticking species lists;
  • Capturing artistically and/or technically perfect images that individually showcase the beauty of the wildlife around us;
  • Putting together a set of images that collectively tell a story about some wildlife or perhaps a conservation programme.

Whatever the photographic motivation, I would always urge photographers not to blindly follow wildlife fads and fashions (of which there are many). You should always think laterally and shoot a wide range of species, not just the cute, cuddly and famous, but also the ignored, forgotten and ugly. They all deserve and often need to be photographed (for the conservation publicity), and not just because a magazine or TV documentary has popularised it.

Cheetahs on the lookout for breakfast. Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds.

Psychology and choice

In subconsciously empathising with wildlife, we are programmed to be more attracted to those animals that in some way look at least a little like us: in other words the higher mammals with flattish faces and forward-facing eyes (abbreviated to 4FE).

These encompass most especially the big cats and apes, but also monkeys, horses and dogs, plus a few others. Think meerkats, orangutans and lions as examples. On top of this, babies of almost any species trump just about everything – cute, cuddly and vulnerable, pleading eyes crying out for protection and care will sway human emotions every time.

Of course, birds rarely if ever fit the 4FE idea, but the cute baby consideration still applies, and the adults of a few species do just happen to have cute, appealing faces – think puffins for example.

So these subconscious considerations can have a major impact on what we choose to photograph. While it is inevitable that you will be drawn to photograph these much of the time, I would always advocate that lateral thinking mentioned above. With this, you can ensure you also include those animals that don’t fit those empathetic or cute criteria, but which nevertheless deserve to be photographed.

Grey Seal pup. Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds.

The equipment and how to use it

Once you’ve done all your preparation, you finally get to use the camera equipment. Camera equipment designed for wildlife photography can be hugely expensive, so don’t be too mesmerised by the glossy adverts for all the kit you ‘need’. Instead, follow these the important points:

  • The camera must be able to work well in poor light conditions typical at dusk and dawn. This essentially means being able to produce good images even when shooting with a high ISO (over 400);
  • Focussing (a combination of the lens and camera working together) needs to be fast, crisp and accurate, and be able to continue working well in low light conditions, when contrast between your subject and the background might well be quite low;
  • A telephoto lens will inevitably be needed, but not necessarily a massively powerful one. The bigger lenses can be very awkward to handle in the field, and it can be annoyingly difficult to find your subject in the camera’s viewfinder, let alone getting it to focus. A smaller lens may restrict certain types of photography, but it can make much of your life easier without cramping your photography overall;
  • Whatever type of lens you have, it must have good optics. Without this, even well-focussed images can come out not as sharp as you would like. This may not be as important if you’re photographing purely for your own enjoyment, but it is critical if you’re intending to get your work published;
  • Although a lot of wildlife photography is carried out with the camera hand-held, you still need to have a good, sturdy tripod, especially for when working in a hide;
  • A flashgun may not get used all that often, but it’s useful to have one to hand, for those occasions when you’re shooting in really poor light and your subject is within the firing range of the flash.
Flamingoes at Lak Nakuru National Park, Kenya. Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds.

The shoot itself

So, finally you get to take some photos, something that can be both exciting and frustrating. The latter results from the many photos you’ll inevitably get of disappearing backsides, tree branches where a fraction of a second before a bird had been sitting, or pictures that seem to be well composed but which are blurred due to a failure of focus. But the excitement and buzz that comes when everything works makes it all worthwhile!

Little tips to bear in mind include:

  • Do not disturb or frighten your subjects. Not only is the stress bad for the animals, but it will result in failure for your photography;
  • When photographing a portrait, try to shoot while the animal is looking at you, giving the sense of interaction;
  • Always focus on an animal’s eyes: we are programmed to look at these, so if they are even slightly blurred the image will not work;
  • Make sure the animal’s eyes are open in the final picture(s). Closed eyes (even if just in a blink) usually ruin a shot, so don’t be shy to take a series of shots in quick succession if necessary;
  • Ensure that your backgrounds are blurred so the animal will stand out clearly from that background – especially important when an animal is a similar colour to the background. This is usually easily achieved when shooting with a telephoto lens;
  • If photographing two or more animals interacting, carefully judge the moment(s) to shoot in order to make the most of the inter-animal interaction. Don’t be afraid to take a series of shots in quick succession;
  • When photographing movement/action make sure your lens is set to track the animal(s), continually adjusting focus. This is one area where lens quality is critical. You’ll often need to shoot with bursts of rapid continuous shooting.

Yet another list, but hopefully these pointers will set you on the road towards successful wildlife photography!

A wildlife photography course

I hope you have enjoyed reading this blog, and watching the recording of my talk, Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds. To learn more about how to actually do wildlife photography in a real life situation, you could join one of my wildlife photography courses. The next one is scheduled for 24th April 2021, and will take place on Exmoor, southwest England. Click on the link to find out more and to sign up.

Philippine Tarsier.

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March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography News

Looking forward to a post-Covid world

March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography News. Windsurfing at Bigbury-on-Sea, Devon.
Windsurfing at Bigbury-on-Sea, Devon, Great Britain.

Moving towards a better spring

Welcome to the March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography news!

With an official roadmap now pointing a way out of Covid lockdown, coupled with the growing success of the vaccination programme, I’m ever more hopeful that my plans for most of what I intend to do this year will be possible.

Coupled with a lot of work online aimed at keeping things going despite lockdown, it has been quite a busy time here, ranging from my ongoing online talks to the development of a new online shop.

So I hope you’ll enjoy reading this newsletter. Below is a list of what you’ll find here this month. Click on any of them to go to the relevant section.

A new Farne Islands photo gallery

February’s talk: Low Light Photography, the recording

Upcoming March online talk: Wildlife Photography, Mammals and Birds

This spring’s photography courses

A tour to Iceland this autumn

Farne Islands: a new wildlife photo gallery

March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography News. Puffins greeting, Farne Islands.

Back in the dim and distant past, namely the summer of 2019, I was able to undertake a great photo shoot in the Farne Islands, off Northumberland’s coast.

The visit coincided with the height of the breeding season, so the islands were a raucous scene of thousands of seabirds, ranging from kittiwakes to puffins to guillemots and razobills.

I finally processed the stills images from that trip during this lockdown, and there is now a gallery of sample images on the website. I’m hoping you might enjoy seeing this latest batch of wildlife photography. Just click on the link below to see the images.

The bulk of the photos are now making their way into a number of photo libraries. I’m also hoping to be able to use some of the images in a new book project in the next year or two.

Watch February’s talk online: Low Light Photography

March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography news. Low Light Photography talk.

My February online talk about Low Light Photography, went ahead on the 24th, with an audience of over 40 people, and seemed to go down very well.

Not surprisingly, the talk covered photographic techniques primarily for shooting between sunset and sunrise: in other words, when the sun is very close to or below the horizon.

Subject matter ranged from landscape photography at dawn, sunrise, sunset and dusk, as well as photography of urban skylines at dusk, combining the ambient blue dusk light with the manmade warmer lighting.

Also covered was night sky photography, which included photography of the moon, the stars as either pinpricks of light or long-exposure trails, and the Northern Lights.

The talk can now be watched online on You Tube, on my website or on my blog. Click on any of the links below.

Wildlife Photography: Mammals and Birds

March’s online photography talk
March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography news. Cheetahs in the Maasai Mara, Kenya.

This month’s online photography talk is already rushing up towards us, scheduled for:


Wed 24th March, 8pm


As you can see, I’ll be talking about wildlife photography, specifically as it relates to photography of mammals and birds; in other words the (mostly) relatively large stuff!

As usual, the talk is free to attend. You just need to register to be sent the link. Registration is open for this talk, as well as the subsequent three talks.

To get more details and to sign up, click on the link below, and then fill in and submit the short form.

You will see on the registration page that there is now a Donation button, so if you feel like making a contribution towards my costs for running these talks by all means feel free: it would be hugely appreciated.

I’ll look forward to seeing you online on 24th March!

Spring Workshops

Provided things continue to improve, then it looks very much as though only one of my spring photography workshops will have to be postponed. That fate belongs to the Low Light Photography course, scheduled originally for 21st March.

I’ve now postponed that event to 7th November, so there’ll be a lot more news on that much later!

So, my first workshop of 2021 will now be South Devon Coast Photography, scheduled for 17th April.

An outline of the planned list of spring workshops is shown below.

The cost for all courses this year is £95 per person, the same as for 2020.

Refunds and deferrments

Rest assured that, if you are booked onto a course that has to be postponed or cancelled, then as with last year, you will have a full range of options, namely:

  • To accept the new date (for a postponed course);
  • To transfer to another course of your choosing;
  • Simply to defer your booking to an as-yet undefined future event;
  • Have a full refund.

Hopefully, things won’t come to this, but I want to put your mind at rest, that you will not lose any money you’ve paid.

See an outline of this spring’s courses below.

South Devon Coast Photography

Bigbury, Burgh Island and Bantham

17th April 2021, 1.30-8.30pm

Photography of some of South Devon’s most beautiful coastline; the beaches, cliffs and river estuary of Bigbury, Burgh Island and Bantham.  Finishing at sunset

Wildlife Photography

Dunster and Lynmouth, Somerset and Devon

24th April 2021, 10am-5pm

A day of wildlife photography on Exmoor, stalking deer in countryside near Dunster, followed by Dippers at Lynmouth.

Travel and architectural photography

Bath

16th May 2021, 10am-5pm

A day spent photographing the magnificent Georgian architecture of Bath, in this combined architectural and travel photography course.

Exmoor in Spring

Tarr Steps, Winsford Hill and Valley of Rocks (Lynton)

22nd May 2021, 2-9pm

An afternoon and evening spent photographing some of the beautiful rivers, woodlands, moors and coastal views, along with one of Exmoor’s most famous prehistoric sites. Finishing with the coastal views at the Valley of Rocks, for a glorious sunset.

Dartmoor in Spring

Dartmeet and Bench Tor

29th May 2021, 1.30-8.30pm

An afternoon and evening spent doing landscape photography in the ancient woodlands along the banks of the River Dart, followed by the rocks and open moors of Bench Tor.

To get full details and to sign up for any of these courses, just click on the link below.

A special note about the Jurassic Coast course, scheduled for October: The first workshop in the autumn will be the Jurassic Coast course, in Lyme Regis and Charmouth. Originally scheduled for 2nd October, I’ve had to reschedule it for 9th October, due to a mistake I made with the tides!

March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography news. A photography course on Burgh Island.

An autumn photography tour to Iceland

March 2021 Nigel Hicks Photography news. Iceland photography tour.

I’m still intending to run this autumn’s Iceland photography tour, unless Covid restrictions have other ideas!

The dates for the tour are;

18-24th Sept 2021


The itinerary is planned to cover mainly northern Iceland, taking in several major waterfalls, volcanoes and the central mountain ranges, as well as a whale-watching trip.

Admittedly, the way things stand at present the tour cannot happen, but if the roadmap works out well then things should change rapidly in the coming few months.

Already, Iceland (as with Cyprus) has lifted restrictions for arriving travellers who can prove they’ve been vaccinated. Further steps needed to make the trip viable include an increase in the number of flights running between Reykjavik and the UK, and relaxation of quarantine rules upon returning to the UK. I’m optimistic that these issues will improve over the summer.

So, if you fancy awarding yourself an overseas photography break to celebrate an escape from Covid, then of course I would love you to sign up. When making a booking the only payment you need to make at this stage is to pay a £100 deposit, returnable if the tour does have to be shelved.

For the full details, including itinerary and pricing click on the link below.

Books about southwest England

Our books about southwest England are of course still out there, still available. Click on the link below to find out more.

Books about southwest England

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Low light photography

A talk about photography techniques between sunset and sunrise

My February online photography talk covered techniques needed for low light photography. These mainly focussed on the photographic skills needed between sunset and sunrise: in other words the time when the sun is on or below the horizon.

Watch the talk here

To watch the talk click on the link below. I hope you’ll enjoy it!

The low light photography talk’s takeaway tips: 1

The principle points while there is still light are:

  • Low light photography usually encompasses the period from sunset to sunrise; in other words when the sun is close to or below the horizon. It can, however, also include photography on dark stormy days;
  • Dawn and sunrise are not the same event, but are two separate events; similarly for sunset and dusk. While dawn and sunrise/sunset and dusk may be separated by only 15 minutes in the tropics, in temperate zones (such as the UK) they are usually separated by at least 30 minutes, and often as much as an hour;
  • When shooting in the evening, don’t put the camera away the moment the sun has set; the best is yet to come with the lovely sky colours often seen in the following dusk. Similarly at dawn – you’ll need to be ‘on location’ nearly an hour before sunrise, in order to be sure of catching the best light;
  • Predicting when there will be a good dawn/sunrise or sunset/dusk is really quite tricky, but can depend on how much dust or water vapour is in the air, as well as how much cloud, of course. Be prepared for disappointments on many occasions;
  • Atmospheric ground mist is mainly a feature of dawn, though it does occasionally appear at dusk. Predicting when there will be a photogenic dawn ground mist is difficult, but chances are good if the ground is very wet, the air above it is much colder than the ground, and the air is completely still;
  • The colours of the ambient light change radically from being warm reddish/orange in the final thirty minutes before sunset, to rather flat and increasingly blue or violet as you progress through the dusk from post-sunset to full darkness;
  • If photographing urban skylines at dusk, try to balance the levels of ambient light (and their degree of blueness) against the intensity and warmth of the yellow manmade lights of the town;
  • Always shoot such an urban skyline while there is still light in the sky – don’t continue once it is completely dark.
Shanghai skyline at dusk: low light photography.

The low light photography talk’s takeaway tips: 2

Once darkness has fallen, consider these points:

  • Once complete darkness has fallen think about photographing streetlife details, such as festivals and/or moving traffic;
  • In rural areas, away from light pollution, move to photograph night skies. To photograph a full (or near-full) moon shoot before it is completely dark and while the moon is low in the sky. Doing this reduces the contrast between the bright moon and the dark sky, making it easier to grab a shot that captures all the moon’s details;
  • To photograph the stars you have a choice of two techniques: a) short exposures that capture the stars as pinpricks of light, and b) long exposures that capture long star trails drawn by the stars as the rotate around the Pole Star;
  • For the former, use a high ISO (say, about 4000), a lens aperture that is wide open, and an exposure of up to about 15 seconds;
  • For the latter, use a low ISO (100), a wide open lens aperture, and an exposure of 20 mins to one hour;
  • For both methods shoot when there is little or no moon;
  • For both methods always have your camera’s high ISO and long exposure noise reduction functions switched on. These will greatly improve image quality, though they will also increase exposure times;
  • It may also be possible to improve image quality by shooting multiple images of the same sky and then merging them together in a star-tracking software, such as Deep Sky Stacker;
  • If shooting the Northern Lights, again use a wide open lens aperture, exposure times of up to 15 seconds, and an ISO of about 800 to 2000, depending on the brightness of the lights. Very often post-photography processing in the computer reveals much more detail and colour than is visible to the eye.
Moonrise; low light photography.

A final word

As a final word about low light photography, bear in mind that although there is a lot to remember by way of techniques and tricks, this time of day frequently yields the most creative and most beautiful images of all. Tak the time to learn and practise these skills. And have fund doing it!

The next photography talk

My next online photography talk will be on 24th March, and will cover Wild Photography: the Mammals and Birds. So a talk about photography of some of the larger animals with which we share this planet.

As usual, the talk is free (though there is the option to give a small donation towards costs). You just need to sign up to receive the talk’s link. Just follow the link below – the donation button will be on that page too.

I’ll look forward to seeing you online on 24th March!

Dawn over the Somerset Levels: low light photography.

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